George R.R. Martin on sex versus violence

 

amandapalmer:

chrisriddellblog:

Love.

who’s got abandonment issues?
NONE OF US. 

nope

amandapalmer:

chrisriddellblog:

Love.

who’s got abandonment issues?

NONE OF US. 

nope

"The cure for anything is salt water. Sweat, tears, or the ocean."
× Isak Dinesen (via wordsthat-speak)
"You deserve happiness. So I left."
× Six Word Story #30  (via thehornygod)
"Power struggles seem to be omnipresent in every field of human endeavor, extending all the way up and down society. We assume that power has a certain reality. Apart from comic books, where Superman has the power to fly, the only power real human beings have is the power they think they have. You see that sometimes in the collapse of a society. Why did the Soviet Union fall? Because one day the Kremlin gave orders and the soldiers said no, and the whole thing fell apart. It’s a fundamental truth that I think Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. , hit on, that power depends on the obedience of the less powerful. A leader is powerful only when he says jump and people jump. He has no actual power to make them jump. It’s their belief that he has power. It’s an illusion, a shadow on the wall. And sometimes people stop jumping, and then the world changes."
× George R.R. Martin (x)
markiana528:

In Artaud’s poetics, art (and thoughts) is an action —and one that, to be authentic, must be brutal —and also an experience suffered, and charged with extreme emotions. Being both action and passion of its sort, iconoclastic as well as evangelical in its fervor, art seems to require a more daring scene, outside the museums and legitimate showplaces, and a new, ruder form of confrontation with its audience. —Susan Sontag, Under the sigh of Saturn
The two women that never stop to inspire me.

markiana528:

In Artaud’s poetics, art (and thoughts) is an action —and one that, to be authentic, must be brutal —and also an experience suffered, and charged with extreme emotions. Being both action and passion of its sort, iconoclastic as well as evangelical in its fervor, art seems to require a more daring scene, outside the museums and legitimate showplaces, and a new, ruder form of confrontation with its audience. —Susan Sontag, Under the sigh of Saturn

The two women that never stop to inspire me.

bluemantle:

Recently my grandmother found out I’m queer. Her response was to tell me that she disapproves of me living with my “friend” (i.e. my girlfriend) and that I should give up my vile queer ways and become a Christian (Lol). She even sent me a bible.  Here are its remains, which I made into black-out poetry.

Poem 1: Bisexual (from Leviticus 19:9)— “Have sexual relations with her.  Have sexual relations with him.  Have sexual relations with both a woman and a man.  Have sexual relations with yourself. Vomit on everyone who does not respect you.”

Poem 2: Fisting (from Judges 8:5)— “water/ lap the water/ drink/go down to drink/your hands/go down/I give into your hands/go down/encouraged/down/on the seashore/the whole hand/your hand/inside/I get to the edge/and shout/grasping/crying out/Beth/Beth/Beth/Beth/Beth/God/I came”

Poem 3: A Letter to the Exiles (from Jeremiah 28:13) — “Ze said: ‘Do not let lies name you, nor harm your heart. Gather. Raise the sword against them. They scorn and reproach, for they have not listened— again and again have not listened.’ “

Poem 4: Child (from Ezekiel 16:22) — “Your father and your mother rubbed salt in. No one looked on you with pity or had compassion enough for you, for on the day you were born you were despised. Live! Grow.  I looked at you and saw you were enough.”

Poem 5: Father (from Ezekiel 16:22) — “You never adored us. You became very angry. You took some out on us. Your sons and daughters were not enough? You slaughtered— in all your detestable practices— our youth.”

Poem 6: Misandry (from Acts 27:41) — “Dangerous men should be broken.”

unhistorical:

The Empyrean, from The Divine Comedy (1861-1868), Gustave Doré

The Empyrean, “from the Medieval Latin empyreus, an adaptation of the Ancient Greek ἔμπυρος empyrus ”in or on the fire (pyr)”, is a region described in the the Paradiso portion of Dante’s Divine Comedy as a place beyond even the highest spheres of Heaven, the dwelling place of God and angels. In The Divine Comedy, Dante is “enveloped by [a] veil of radiance” as he ascends to the Empyrean.

Some medieval writers conceived of it as a celestial sphere formed from pure fire, but others contested that it burned with light rather than elemental fire, as Thomas Aquinas described in the Summa Theologica"wholly luminous… that heaven is called the empyrean, not from its fiery heat, but from its brightness". 

handsfulloflsd:

nevermore.

Edgar Allan Poe.

Annoying Potholes Turned Into Wonderfully Amusing Scenarios

Annoying Potholes Turned Into Wonderfully Amusing Scenarios

oldbookillustrations:

The huntress Dian.
Arthur Rackham, from Comus, by John Milton, New York, London, 1921.
(Source: archive.org.)

oldbookillustrations:

The huntress Dian.

Arthur Rackham, from Comus, by John Milton, New York, London, 1921.

(Source: archive.org.)

"you are everything i want
you are a poem i cannot write
a word i cannot translate
you are an exit wound
a name i cannot bring myself
to say aloud"
× Jeanann Verlee, excerpt from “Exit Wound” (via larmoyante)

daddyloveshislittle:

fer1972:

Bent Objects by Terry Border

Cute!

L

mapsontheweb:

Dante’s Inferno: a helpful diagram to eternal damnation

mapsontheweb:

Dante’s Inferno: a helpful diagram to eternal damnation

theme